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and tax increases at the start of 2013. from the white house came word that president obama will try to build public pressure on congress to raise taxes on the wealthy and prevent tax hikes for everyone else. white house spokesman jay carney. >> well, the president believes very strongly that the american people matter in this debate. because this debate is about them. the question of whether or not taxes go up on 98% of american tax payers is a very important to ordinary americans. it is not just a matter for discussion between the president and the senate minority leader. or other congressional leaders. >> brown: to that end the president met privately today with small business owners. on friday he'll travel to the philadelphia area to speak further on the issue. not to be outdone, house republicans said they'll meet with small business owners and workers in their districts arguing against the president's plan. in the senate republican my ontario leader mitch mcconnell dismissed the president's new tactics. >> as we head into the fiscal cliff negotiations, my advice to the presiden
for higher taxes on top income earners, something missing from the g.o.p. plan. with just three weeks left, the two sides are still at odds with their opening offers. with time ticking away to reach a deal before tax cuts expire and spending cuts hit, president obama today said he's still optimistic a deal will be done and he's willing to compromise, but negotiations just aren't there yet. >> it's going to require what i talked about in the campaign, which is a balanced, responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure the country grows. >> tom: the president rejected the proposal republicans presented him yesterday. it would cut the debt by $2.2 trillion over ten years, but would not raise taxes on america's highest earners, the biggest sticking point. the two sides seem to be allowing themselves room to bargain. the president said today he'd be open to lowering tax rates for high earners later next year as part of a broad tax reform package. and senate republican leader mitch mcconnell did not directly endorse the g.o.p. plan. for now, house
they'd offered up new tax revenues, but have heard nothing from democrats about spending cuts. democrats said republicans were dragging their feet. we begin with darren gersh reporting even a visit by treasury secretary timothy geithner did little to change the mood on capitol hill. >> reporter: house speaker john boehner emerged from his sit- down with the president's negotiating team to declare he was disappointed. two weeks after the election, the speaker said democrats have yet to show what he called "adult leadership." >> right now, all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap, it needs leadership. it's time for the president and congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they are really willing to make. >> reporter: that's not how the white house sees it. the administration called the republican position that tax rates should not change implausible after the election. and the white house warned republicans against using the debt limit as leverage to force agreement. >> asking for... that a political price be paid in
to tell them to pass tax cuts for everyone making less that $250,000 a year. >> 97% of small businesses would not see their income tax go up by a single dime. even the wealthiest americans would still get a tax cut on the first $250,000 of their income. >> reporter: the speaker dismissed a call from a fellow republican to give the president what he wants, saying it's not good economics to raise tax rates on small businesses. >> going over the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy and hurt job creation in our country. this is not good for our country. it's as simple as that, and the president understands it. >> reporter: corporate leaders were also making the rounds. a group from the simpson/bowles backed organization "fix the debt" stopped in for talks on capitol hill. and later, c.e.o.s from yahoo, archers daniel midlands, caterpillar and other companies headed to the white house for a meeting with the president. >> i'd like to hear the president's views about where the country is headed and support him any way we can. >> reporter: treasury secretary timothy geithner will meet with congre
% of my constituents certainly don't need a tax increase. gwen: some dig their heels in. >> seems like our friends on the other side are having some difficulty kind of turning off the campaign. gwen: the standoff extends to presidential appointments, as u.n. ambassador susan rice struggles to defuse opposition to her possible nomination to secretary of state. >> i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. >> i would just ask the president to step back for a moment and realize that all of us here hold the secretary of state to a very different standard than most cabinet members. gwen: who will win the first rounds of the post-election battle? covering the week, gloria borger of cnn, susan davis of "usa today," and mike viqueira of nbc news. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens, live from our nation's capitol, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875 we'v
would raise $800 billion in revenues by closing loop-holes and reforming the tax code, but stops short of specifics. noticeably missing: the higher taxes on high-wage earners which president obama has insisted on. the white house responded, saying "the g.o.p. proposal does not meet the test of balance. in fact, it actually promises to lower rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bill." it's not just the federal government under pressure. credit ratings agency fitch calls the fiscal cliff the biggest concern for state credit in 2013. saying, "any meaningful federal deficit reduction is likely to lower state funding, forcing program elimination or backfilling." as the tax hikes and spending cuts approach, u.s. manufacturers saw business shrink last month. the institute of supply management's purchasing managers index fell unexpectedly to 49.5, down from 51.7 in october. a reading below 50 means business has fallen back into contraction. the november statistic is the lowest since july 2009. the dow fell 60, the nasdaq down eight, the s&p 500 lost six. >> susie: jeff sa
as the nation edged closer toward a so- called fiscal cliff that could raise taxes by year's end. we begin with a report from newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top two percent go up. we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: in his first interview since the election, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the republicans may present. but we are not going to simply cut our way to prosperity or to cut our way out of this deficit problem that we have. we're going to need more revenues. in order to do that, that starts with higher rates for the folks at the top. >> reporter: the president did say today he would consider lowering rates again for the top two percent next year as part of a broader tax overhaul. the house republican plan envisions $2.2 trillion in deficit reductions over the next decade. $800 billion would come from ne
speaker characterized the negotiations to avoid huge tax increases and spending cuts at a stalemate. the race to solve the fiscal cliff triggered another round of dramatic sound bites from republicans and president obama. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: the president is still pushing to wrap up a deal on the fiscal cliff before christmas and just in case anyone missed that point, he visited a toy factory to urge congress to avoid raising taxes on the middle class. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. a typical middle-class family of four would see their income taxes go up by about $2,200. >> reporter: the president is proposing to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion, while cutting spending by $400 billion. on top of that, mr. obama asked for $50 billion more for infrastructure spending and $140 billion to extend unemployment insurance benefits and the payroll tax cut. republicans literally laughed it off. >> they want... they want to have this extra spending that's actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mea
get the latest on the efforts to resolve the impasse over tax hikes and spending cuts. >> brown: then, we get two views of a palestinian bid for limited statehood, ahead of a key vote tomorrow at the united nations. >> warner: wonder why your bills are going up? paul solman examines "the fine print" with author and journalist david cay johnston. >> i'm not against corporations. i am in favor of rules that make you earn your profits in the competitive market. you don't get them through a government rule that lets the company reach in your wallet and take money. the kinds of profits that we're >> brown: after the election, what's next for immigration reform? ray suarez asks texas senator kay bailey hutchison and illinois representative luis gutierrez. >> warner: and on the "daily download," we look at how the obama administration is re-using digital information gathered for the campaign to rally support now. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations
an agreement on taxes and spending could come in time for the holidays. >> i believe that both parties can agree on a frame work that does that in the coming weeks. in fact my hope is to get this done before christmas. >> you know me, i was born with the glass half full. i'm an optimist. >> brown: hopeful signs emanated from the white house and the capitol today, about getting a deal before the new year brings automatic tax hikes and spending cuts. president obama offered his optimism at an event with middle-class americans who'd be hit by any tax increase. >> i'm glad to see-- if you've been reading the papers lately-- - that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. >> brown: one such lawmaker is republican house member tom cole of oklahoma. the journal "politico" reported he's urging colleagues to extend middle class tax cuts but allow tax rates for top earners to rise for now. that's what the presi
. "the new york times" reported republicans might accept higher tax rates on wealthier americans to avoid triggering tax hikes for everyone. in return, they'd demand greater spending cuts next year before raising the federal borrowing limit. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tie negotiations to debt ceiling votes and take us to the brink of default once again as part of a budget negotiation, which, by the way, we have never done in our history until we did it last year, i will not play that game because we've got to... we've got to break that habit before it starts. >> reporter: the 2011 standoff between the president and republicans led the nation to the brink of national default. standard and poor's even lowered its rating on u.s. government bonds. now, the president has proposed he be given authority to raise the debt ceiling without congressional action. house republicans reject that idea. and they've called for raising revenue without rate hikes, plus major savings in entitlement programs. the president argued today a partial deal is possible on taxes, if the g
their counter- offer to the president's plan for a deal both sides say is needed to avoid year-end tax increases. the move was the latest volley in an increasingly tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance that is necessary without raising rates on the top 2% wealthiest americans. the math simply does not add up. >> ifill: the white house proposes raising $1.6 trillion in taxes over ten years, imposing higher rates on those making more than $250,000 a year. in a letter sent to the white house today, speaker of the house john boehner rejected the president's approach, writing that republicans cannot in good conscience agree to this approach which is neither balanced nor realistic. his counter-offer, save $2.2 trillion by among other things raising $800 billion in new revenues
day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've been keeping my own naughty and nice lists for washington. >> warner: the president chose a seasonal setting, a toy factory in hatfield, pennsylvania, and holiday imagery to press again for extending tax cuts for the middle class. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1. i mean, i... i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. >> no. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> warner: in washington, republicans portrayed the road trip as so much humbug, at a time, they said, when negotiations are going nowhere. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. >> warner: house speaker john boehner said republicans remain willing to raise revenues, but not by raising tax rates. and he charged the white house isn't
these negotiations very carefully. the sticking point for conservative republicans is to agree to raise taxes. one of them is republican congressman from georgia, jack houston. there's a lot at stake in america and international economies as well. can you reassure them that you will come to some sort of a deal? >> i think that we will. we're in the early stages of the serious negotiations and that president -- the president has put forth an offer and speaker john boehner has put forth that offer. the fact that this is rejected is to be expected but it is testing ground. we have seen that between them have gone through this process. i believe we will get there. both sides so that we cannot win are refusing to compromise. we both have our right to be here and we have countered with some revenue in places. we want to see what the president will do in terms of cuts. where are concerned about the deficit. i believe we will get there. i really do. >> you are a perennial optimist. you make everything seem sunny. we are at a stalemate. republicans do not want to raise taxes and democrats to know what to -
lawmakers are making little progress in resolving the stand-off over tax increases and spending cuts. the dow fell 89 points, the nasdaq lost nine, the s&p 500 down seven. >> tom: as susie mentioned, talks to resolve the fiscal cliff are moving slowly. one reason is that there is deep disagreement over whether entitlement programs like social security and medicare should be on the table right now or not, and the disagreement is sharpest over social security. darren gersh takes a look at why. >> reporter: the number-two man in the senate democratic leadership argues any fix for social security's finances should come after the immediate challenge is out of the way. >> i think we should take social security off the table for the current fiscal cliff and deficit discussion, but be very honest about what we're going to achieve in the near term. >> reporter: republicans pushed back, arguing social security is part of the deficit problem because it is no longer taking in enough in taxes to cover the benefits it pays out. social security makes up the difference by cashing in special treasury
as year-end tax hikes and spending cuts moved another day closer. on the face of it there seemed to be little movement today. >> no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. >> sreenivasan: treasury secretary timothy geithner and legislative chief rob nabors arrived at the capitol this morning, for meetings with congressional leaders. house speaker john boehner also spoke to president obama on the phone last night. he said he wanted to know where the administration would rein in spending, but that he had heard nothing new. >> i was hopeful we'd see a specific plan for cutting spending. we sought to find out today what the president is really willing to do. listen, i remain hopeful that productive conversations in the days ahead can be had but the white house has to get serious. >> sreenivasan: senate minority leader mitch mcconnell echoed that complaint. in a statement, he said, "today, they took a step backward and significantly closer to the cliff." conversely, white house spokesman jay carney charged republi
corporation tax. the company has nearly 1/3 of the uk coffee shop market, but has only paid the tax once in the past 15 years. starbucks has been stung by public criticism of its actions. you're watching "bbc world news america." still to come on tonight's program, nearly 25 years after a deadly gas attack, one kurdish town is still trying to identify the scores of people who died. to japan now, where the authorities are trying to figure out how tunnel collapsed on sunday, killing at least nine people. huge concrete slabs in the tunnel smashed on to cars. that started a fire on the main route from tokyo to central japan. we report now on that story. >> only this morning, the mangled wreckage of three vehicles was brought -- early this morning, the mangled wreckage of three vehicles was brought from the tunnel. last came a small delivery truck. the driver had been trapped, but alive. by the time rescuers got to him, he was dead. the collapsed tunnel lies deep in the mountains of central japan, just to the north of mount fuji. it is part of the expressway that links tokyo to central and we
will now be squeezed, and there will be a tax rates on the pension pops. >> i know these tax measures willthought to balance not be r. ways to reduce the deficit never are. but we must act together. when you look for savings, it is fair to local to the 1%. >> with multiple forecasts being downgraded, it has now become an issue about competence. they argue not only has the chancellor failed, but failed on his own terms. >> it has been completely derailed. the one test they set for themselves, balance the books and get the debt falling by 2015, that is now in tatters. >> after all, the facts and figures of the chancellor's statement -- after all of the facts and figures of the chancellor's statement, we are left with a feeling of malaise. >> you are watching bbc world news america. still to come, aero controversy at the hospital after the duchess of game birds -- the after information on the duchess of cambridge is released to two is jockeys. >> in bangkok, thousands of thais turned out to catch a glimpse of the mark on his 85th birthday in a rare public appearance prepare aero controvy
. >> rose: right. >> i don't think the tax question was a hard question. the commerce clause question i think was hard. i could have seen that coming out the other way. but to be in the majority on that, but lose on the tax question, i would never have guessed. >> rose: i mean, i was totally surprised by the tax aspect of it. >> tell me about it. >> rose: i presume you have -- it came out of left field to people or right field, which was it? >> and it was a tax for one purpose but not for another purpose. anyway, water over the d a.m. >> rose: i know you always say that. you sort of say to people about bush versus gore. get over it, get over it. >> >> rose: yet it decide add presidential election. >> the supreme court was going to decide it. the issue was -- >> rose: you blame gore because he. >> he wanted judges to decide it so judges decided it. >> rose: you have no regret about that, do you? >> oh, it was an easy case, it really was. >> rose: why was it so easy? >> look,. >> rose: you stopped the florida court -- >> yes, but on a principled question of whether the florida courts viol
influential tax >> he did released three albums but they completely real imagine what the electric guitar could do. people are still exploring what he laid out in those records. it also does not heard he was flamboyant, as flamboyant as he was gifted. he died tragically young. >> he has been described as number one. aru else is a distant number 2. >> he continues to be the mountaintop. he tops every magazine poll. you are right. everybody is a distant number 2. his contemporaries knew this. when he came to london, eric clapton, pete townshend saw him play. people were aghast at his incredible ability, and the volume. >> what was it he did with his electric guitar that was so new? i'm talking about the music. >> well, leaving aside the theatrics, which he did was explorer feedback in a way no one had. he pushed the guitar passed limits that people understood it to have. his sound is one that what he played and the screeching noise as he could conjure and control. he recreated the instrument and it showed what his possibilities were. >> you have to talk about his physicality. he was scruffy
: house republican leaders offered their own proposal today to avert the prospect of a year-end tax hike. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get perspective on the partisan tug- of-war in washington, from one half of the team that produced
to increase taxes on the wealthiest americans. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, kwame holman has the latest on wast
. >> the defensive marriage act passed in 1996 which says for federal tax and other federal purposes, marriage shall be defined only between a man and a woman. so a couple of different federal court of appeals in the second circuit and the first circuit have struck down that aspect of doma, saying that the federal government has to treat same-sex married couples from those states that recognize same-sex marriage as married for federal purposes. so i think a lot of people properly speculate that the supreme court will have to take at least one of these doma cases, because when lower courts are struck down in a federal statute, that's a big deal, and we have to get a resolution of that. whether the supreme court says at the same time it's going to go ahead and take the prop 8 case alongside or whether it will take a doma case and sit on the prop 8 case for some periods of months and then resolve the doma case and see how it feels about prop 8 after that is a more difficult question. >> certainly the court hasn't wanted to go too far ahead of what they see as a national consens consensus, but it's safe
, and no new taxes on the wealthy. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. auto sales speed up in november, with buyers taking advantage of ultra-cheap financing to ditch
're rewarding shareholders with special dividends ahead of higher taxes in 2013. >> susin
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)